Small Scale, Starting Up, and Body Mechanics

  • Many Forks Farm 1360 River Road Clarksburg, MA, 01247 United States

Many Forks Farm started in the 2012 season on 2 acres of leased land with ¾ acre in cultivation and selling at one farmers’ market. In 2015, the farm purchased the property of  .5 acres and also leases an adjacent parcel of land, predominantly wooded. There are currently 2 acres in cultivation of vegetables, a small mushroom yard, raspberries, a propagation greenhouse, a caterpillar, and two moveable high tunnels. The farm’s produce is distributed through a 50-member CSA, farmers markets, and an heirloom tomato seedling sale. The strategy for financial sustainability is to develop a number of different enterprises, perhaps small in and of themselves, which combine to create viability as a whole – all while committing to a hyper-local customer base. The farm does not plan to expand greatly beyond its current land base in cultivation, but to increase production through improving soil fertility, efficiencies, practices and infrastructure. 

Come see how we started and where we are, how the constraints and attributes of our land base have affected our planning and our hopes for creating a long-term community resource. We’ll also cover some of the practical choices and options to consider for starting up your own farm operation. 

Body Mechanics - Farming is not this farmer’s first career (though perhaps her first love). Sharon spent 30 years teaching movement and dance to actors and dancers - while gardening and thinking about farming. Understanding how to approach the everyday physical demands of a career in dance has likely made it physically possible  for her to start farming later in ife. She will share some basic principles in using the body in the physical stresses of farming to promote freedom from injury and a long farming life.